Skiers wrap up season at Sugarbush Resort

Sunday marks day 159, and the last day of the ski season, at the Sugarbush Resort in Warren. “We like to go the first weekend in May, and this year it was May Day, so here we are,” says John Bleh of Sugarbush Ski Resort. The skiers came to end the season in style under the sun. “When you get the warm spring day, it’s like paying penance for being out here in the minus five and minus eight days of January,” says Steven MacDonald, a skier who traveled from Saratoga. the slopes here in May are the same ones that brave the cold in January, like Jim, an 81-year-old lifelong skier. Sutar. “We ski on this mountain here. in this stiff thing. And I’m one of those who do! I don’t ski like the guys who pass me. Its good. I just arrive there. I don’t fall,” Soutar said. Soutar started coming to Sugarbush in the 60s when he was working as a ski patroller. “I’m not working today. You know. I’m skiing on my own. And that’s good because I got older,” he said. Snowmaking capabilities have helped Sugarbush stay open if “We had a lot of temperature swings and a lot of melting and dry spells. It was a pretty tough season,” Bleh said. Pent-up excitement and demand kept skiers on the slopes and snow guns to operate all season.” It was kind of the first year after COVID, it was great to see everyone coming back and seeing some great tours. You compare that with the tough weather this year, it’s is even more encouraging in the sense that there is clearly a demand for the sport,” Bleh said.

Sunday marks day 159, and the last day of the ski season, at the Sugarbush Resort in Warren.
“We like to go the first weekend in May, and this year it was May Day, so here we are,” says John Bleh of Sugarbush Ski Resort.

The skiers came to end the season in style under the sun.

“When you have a hot day in the spring, it’s like paying penance for being out here in January minus five and minus eight,” says Steven MacDonald, a skier who traveled from Saratoga.

A large number of the people on the slopes here in May are the same people who brave the cold in January, like 81-year-old skier Jim. Sutar.

“We ski this mountain right here. in this stiff thing. And I’m one of those who do! I don’t ski like the guys who pass me. Its good. I just arrive there. I don’t fall,” Soutar said.

Soutar started coming to Sugarbush in the 60s when he was working as a ski patroller.

“I’m not working today. You know. I’m skiing on my own. And that’s good, because I got older,” he said.

Snowmaking capabilities have helped Sugarbush stay open so late.

“We had a lot of temperature swings and a lot of melting and dry spells. It was quite a tricky season,” Bleh said.

Pent-up excitement and demand kept skiers on the slopes and snow guns running all season.

“It was kind of the first year after COVID, it was great to see everyone coming back and seeing some great visits. You compare that with the difficult weather this year, it’s even more encouraging in the sense that there is clearly a demand for the sport,” Bleh said.

Sugarbush is excited to welcome skiers back next season with even more snowmaking improvements.

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